Lesser known Irish foods

Chances are many people have heard of Irish soda bread and corned beef and cabbage, both of which are especially popular on St. Patrick’s Day (although the latter isn’t entirely authentic Irish cuisine). But there are many different traditional Irish dishes that may not be as well-known and enjoyed outside of Ireland. Irish cuisine is loaded with rich meat and potatoes dishes, and there are some delicious delicacies to be discovered along the way.

Boxty
Many different cultures have boxty-like dishes in their culinary repertoires. Boxty is similar to latkes or German kartoffelpuffer. It is made from both grated raw potatoes and mashed potatoes. Historians believe it originated during the potato famine of the mid-19th century.

Coddle
Being frugal with leftovers means finding delicious ways to reimagine ingredients into new meals. Coddle is a byproduct of that line of thinking. A coddle is a one-pot meal made from leftover sausage, potatoes, onions, and even bacon. The name comes from “coddling” or simmering the stew.

Shellfish
Individuals outside of Ireland may not immediately associate shellfish with the Emerald Isle, but shellfish are plentiful in the waters around Ireland. Dublin Bay prawns, cockles, mussels, and clams all can be scooped out of the waters. Galway even has an Oyster festival each year in September.

Irish stew
Irish stew is a dish made with potatoes, onions and mutton. Mutton is meat from a sheep that is more than 1 year old and ideally 3 years old, according to The Spruce: Eats. The flavor is very strong and it contains a considerable amount of fat. Mutton is more popular in Europe and the Middle East due to its gamey flavor. It is best for slow-cooking methods, which is why it is the perfect addition in a stew that should be simmered for hours.

Champ
Fans of mashed potatoes are likely to take to champ, a very similar dish. It is made with potatoes, milk, butter, and scallions. It is customary to make a well of melted butter in the center of a serving.

Colcannon
Mashed potatoes shine once again in this dish that also includes cabbage. Colcannon is typically served with boiled ham in Ireland.

Pudding
Irish pudding is not a dessert but a savory sausage dish. The “black” variety includes pork, fat and blood and is mixed with barley, oatmeal and suet. White pudding is similar, but it doesn’t include the pork blood. A slice of both black and white pudding is traditionally served in a complete Irish breakfast

Barmbrack
Usually shortened to “brack,” this dish is an Irish fruitcake that features fruit, raisins and spices. Most people soak it in tea and whiskey overnight.

Traditional Irish cooking will include one of the delicious foods mentioned above.

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